About

Craig Randall

I am a husband, father, software architect, jazz lover and ex-avid mountain biker (i.e. before the father role kicked in).

Making a positive impact is what motivates me.

I excel at active listening, problem solving, finishing initiatives, grasping new technologies quickly, making complex technology straightforward to understand and implement, tailoring development processes, maintaining discretion, not taking myself too seriously, mentoring others, displaying a common sense attitude, motivating individuals, technical writing and review, speaking publicly to a variety of audiences (customers, partners, analysts, architects, developers), being honest, working across functions, and respecting people.

Currently at Oracle, I’m Chief Architect of the Health Sciences Global Business Unit (HSGBU) where I manage a team of senior architects with domain expertise that spans the HSGBU product portfolio and am responsible for the architecture of Oracle’s product offerings in healthcare, life sciences and safety (“health sciences”).

Previously I was Senior Technologist and Principal Scientist at Adobe focused on integrations architecture across the Adobe Digital Marketing Suite, including Adobe’s Web Experience Management offerings. In that role I enjoyed working with customers, partners and Adobe colleagues to help realize differentiated experiences for their customers.

Prior to my Digital Marketing focus I served as Adobe’s Chief Architect for Customer Experience Management, responsible for the architecture of the Adobe Digital Enterprise Platform and the Customer Experience Solutions it powers. In this role I formed and ran the Systems Architecture Team, directing a group of domain architects and technical leads to ensure the robustness of our platform and solutions.

A specific aspect to my joining Adobe was to address the need for world-class Web Experience Management capabilities in Adobe’s enterprise portfolio, since the Web is the hub of customer interaction and engagement. I was responsible for the technical due diligence that led to Adobe’s acquisition of Day Software in October 2010, and was instrumental in Day’s subsequent integration into Adobe, not just from a products/technology perspective but also from a people/culture/process perspective.

I served on the advisory board of DocVerse, a startup focused on enabling real-time sharing and editing of Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint documents. DocVerse was successfully acquired by Google on 3/5/2010.

Prior to Adobe, I was a Distinguished Engineer at EMC Corporation (inducted October 2008), focused on enterprise content management (ECM) in general and more specifically on the integration of ECM with front-/back-office solutions via software services. I also served as an active member of the CMA CTO Council, Architecture Team, and Platform Technology Office. I was at EMC (via its acquisition of Documentum) for more than 11 years and was responsible for the architecture of several of the products in the Documentum family, including Documentum RESTful Services, Documentum Interoperability Services (platform CMIS provider), Documentum Foundation Services (DFS) (awarded U.S. patent 7792979 and U.S. patent 8145610), Documentum Application Connectors (awarded U.S. patent 7653732 and U.S. patent 8086667), Documentum Client for Outlook, Documentum Web Development Kit, Documentum Desktop, and Documentum ADO.NET Services.

Since 2006, I’ve been actively working with technical staff from EMC, IBM and Microsoft on a proposed content management standard: Content Management Interoperability Services (CMIS). CMIS was publicly announced on 9/10/2008, and has been submitted to OASIS under the auspices of a Technical Committee (TC) on which I was an active, voting member, first with EMC and then with Adobe (i.e. through May 2012).

I was an active, charter member of the Microsoft Architect Advisory Board (MAAB) during its existence, serving on its Smart Client Architectures working group. I also served on the Microsoft Integrated Data Partner Advisory Council (i.e. what was the PAC for WinFS, Microsoft’s next-generation integrated storage vision that was redirected in June 2006). For my work in the Microsoft community, I was awarded Most Valuable Professional (MVP) status by Microsoft from July 2006 through June 2008 and again as a Solutions Architect MVP throughout 2009.

In the Java community I served on the expert groups for JSR-127 (Java Server Faces) and JSR-52 (JSP Standard Tag Library).

I’ve regularly spoken at enterprise software user and developer conferences and have technically reviewed published books on software (e.g. Software Factories by Jack Greenfield and Keith Short).

If you’re interested in my resume, please visit my profile on LinkedIn, where you can also contact me. Thanks in advance for your interest.